The black cat edgar allan poe analysis essay

Honeymooning in Hungary, Joan and Peter Allison share their train compartment with Dr. Vitus Verdegast, a courtly but tragic man who is returning to the remains of the town he defended before becoming a prisoner of war for fifteen years. When their hotel-bound bus crashes in a mountain storm and Joan is injured, the travellers seek refuge in the home, built fortress-like upon the site of a bloody battlefield, of famed architect Hjalmar Poelzig. There, cat-phobic Verdegast learns his wife's fate, grieves for his lost daughter, and must play a game of chess for Allison's life. Written by Sister Grimm <srgrimm@>

This dread was not exactly a dread of physical evil - and yet I should be at a loss how otherwise to define it. I am almost ashamed to own - yes, even in this felon's cell, I am almost ashamed to own - that the terror and horror with which the animal inspired me, had been heightened by one of the merest chimaeras it would be possible to conceive. My wife had called my attention, more than once, to the character of the mark of white hair, of which I have spoken, and which constituted the sole visible difference between the strange beast and the one I had destroyed. The reader will remember that this mark, although large, had been originally very indefinite; but, by slow degrees - degrees nearly imperceptible, and which for a long time my Reason struggled to reject as fanciful - it had, at length, assumed a rigorous distinctness of outline. It was now the representation of an object that I shudder to name - and for this, above all, I loathed, and dreaded, and would have rid myself of the monster had I dared - it was now, I say, the image of a hideous - of a ghastly thing - of the GALLOWS! - oh, mournful and terrible engine of Horror and of Crime - of Agony and of Death!

Although Pluto is a neutral character at the beginning of the story, he becomes antagonistic in the narrator’s eyes once the narrator becomes an alcoholic. The alcohol pushes the narrator into fits of intemperance and violence, to the point at which everything angers him – Pluto in particular, who is always by his side, becomes the malevolent witch who haunts him even while avoiding his presence. When the narrator cuts Pluto’s eye from its socket, this can be seen as symbolic of self-inflicted partial blindness to his own vision of moral goodness . [7]

Poe's literary career began in 1827 with the release of 50 copies of Tamerlane and Other Poems credited only to "a Bostonian", a collection of early poems that received virtually no attention. [11] In December 1829, Poe released Al Aaraaf, Tamerlane, and Minor Poems in Baltimore [12] before delving into short stories for the first time with " Metzengerstein " in 1832. [13] His most successful and most widely read prose during his lifetime was " The Gold-Bug ", [14] which earned him a $100 prize, the most money he received for a single work. [15] One of his most important works, " The Murders in the Rue Morgue ", was published in 1841 and is today considered the first modern detective story. [16] Poe called it a "tale of ratiocination ". [1] Poe became a household name with the publication of " The Raven " in 1845, [17] though it was not a financial success. [18] The publishing industry at the time was a difficult career choice and much of Poe's work was written using themes specifically catered for mass market tastes. [19]

The black cat edgar allan poe analysis essay

the black cat edgar allan poe analysis essay

Poe's literary career began in 1827 with the release of 50 copies of Tamerlane and Other Poems credited only to "a Bostonian", a collection of early poems that received virtually no attention. [11] In December 1829, Poe released Al Aaraaf, Tamerlane, and Minor Poems in Baltimore [12] before delving into short stories for the first time with " Metzengerstein " in 1832. [13] His most successful and most widely read prose during his lifetime was " The Gold-Bug ", [14] which earned him a $100 prize, the most money he received for a single work. [15] One of his most important works, " The Murders in the Rue Morgue ", was published in 1841 and is today considered the first modern detective story. [16] Poe called it a "tale of ratiocination ". [1] Poe became a household name with the publication of " The Raven " in 1845, [17] though it was not a financial success. [18] The publishing industry at the time was a difficult career choice and much of Poe's work was written using themes specifically catered for mass market tastes. [19]

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